Maryland’s CLAPP Program: Expanded Certification Periods and Regulatory Streamlining Aids Counties’ Effort to Preserve Farmland

Planning in Progress

by Daniel Rosen, AICP, Resource Conservation Planner, with Kristen E. Humphrey, MLA, Local Assistance and Training Planner 

Photo credit: public domain

Created in 1990, the state’s Certification of Local Agricultural Preservation Programs (CLAPP) allows certified counties to retain 75% of locally generated agricultural land transfer tax instead of the default rate of 33%.

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Reminder to Jurisdictions: Submission Deadline for Nuisance Flood Plans Approaching

Planning in Progress

Tidally-driven nuisance floods are happening with more frequency. While nuisance flooding may not pose a serious threat or result in major damage, these events can interrupt and impact daily routines and negatively impact commerce. 

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Take MDOT’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Traffic Data Survey!

Planning in Progress

The Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) is examining ways pedestrian and bicycle traffic data are collected across the state – currently done in a variety of methods and used to evaluate project effectiveness, variations in overall volumes, and crash data analyses.   

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Congratulations to David Cotton!

Planning in Progress

David Cotton,  ARC Program Manager and Director of Planning’s Western Maryland Regional Office, made the cover of the 16th edition of TrailGuide, the official, authorized guidebook for traveling the Great Allegheny Passage and C&O Canal Towpath. David has been instrumental in the development of the Great Alleghany Passage in his official capacity with Planning, and is a bicycling enthusiast himself.

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Local Communities Seek New Ways to Respond to Hunger and Homelessness During the Pandemic

Planning in Progress

by Kristen Humphrey, MLA, Local Assistance and Training Planner

Even under normal circumstances, some of the most vulnerable people in our country’s population are those who are homeless and/or hungry. Without adequate shelter, sanitation, a stable supply of nutritious and fresh food, they are already subject to physical and mental illness, disease, exposure, malnutrition, and violence at much higher rates than the average American. But in times of a pandemic, these vulnerabilities worsen. Continue reading